Volunteers Needed for Bakesale

Holy Trinity will host an arts gala benefit for Romero House, a residence for refugees in Toronto’s west end, on Sunday March 28 at 7:30 p.m. Apart from ticket sales, there will be a number of other fund-raising activities at this event.  All proceeds will go to support the work of Romero House.

Holy Trinity and San Esteban have been asked to organize and run a bake sale at the intermission.  We need several volunteers to help during the actual sale, as well as donations of baked goods, and “finger food” that can be eaten without utensils, such as cookies, cupcakes, cheese and crackers, empanadas, and cut-up fruit and vegetables. Items from the bake sale will be sold by donation and all proceeds will go to Romero House. We are expecting 200-300 people to attend this event.

“Building Communities of Wisdom”

A sermon preached on February 28, 2010 by Christopher Lind

Please repeat after me this prayer:

Serenity Prayer (by Reinhold Niebuhr)

“May God grant me the serenity

To accept the things I cannot change;

The courage to change the things that I can;

And the wisdom to know the difference.”

I have been thinking a lot about Wisdom recently. Partly this is because of the difficult choices we are faced with as a community. Partly this is because as individuals we are always and repeatedly faced with decisions where the right answer is not obvious. Maybe we don’t have enough information? Maybe our timeline is too short. Whatever the stress, we find ourselves yearning for the Wisdom of Solomon.

You may remember Solomon as the King of Israel who rendered a famous judgment. Two women were arguing about a baby, each claiming the baby as their own. When Solomon suggested dividing the child in two with a sword and giving each woman a half, one of the women refused the offer saying she would rather lose the baby than have it killed and divided. By this Solomon identified the child’s true mother.

In the Biblical tradition, Solomon is considered the model of wisdom. Solomon is the son of King David and when he becomes King, he prays to God not for long life or wealth or death of his enemies, but for discernment in administering justice. God grants his wish and

“The whole world sought audience with Solomon to hear the wisdom God had put in his heart.” (1 Kings 10:24)

Other wise men and women are also examples of the Wisdom tradition. These are craftsmen, royal counselors, sorcerors, magicians, astrologers & professional sages (see Isa 3:2-3). So, Joseph in his role as the interpreter of dreams for the Pharaoh is a good example of the Wisdom tradition but so too are the most wise men of all, the 3 Kings from the East, who come every Christmas, right on cue.

As you can see, Wisdom is international (Jer 10:4 “wise ones of all the nations”). Wisdom doesn’t come from just one place. It can come from any place and you know it when you experience it. Wisdom is not limited to Israel and it didn’t originate there but Wisdom was one of the major facets of Near Eastern culture. The book of Proverbs refers to God giving us “30 sayings of admonition & knowledge” (Prov 22:20) and some scholars think they come from an ancient Egyptian wisdom book with 30 chapters. In the same way some scholars think large portions of the book of Job (3:1–42:6) may be a reworked Edomite tale.

Wisdom is also a complex theological term because it represents an alternative way of understanding the statement “Jesus is the Christ, the Word of God”. You see, in the book of Proverbs Wisdom is described as the first work of God at the beginning of Creation (Prov 8:21-31). So, when in the beginning of John’s Gospel we read “in the beginning was the Word” we are seeing the writer of John’s Gospel say that the Word of God is the Wisdom of God. This also makes sense of St. Paul’s claim in 1Corinthians when he describes Christ as “the power of God and the Wisdom of God… [and also as the one] who became for us wisdom from God.” (1Cor 24, 30).

There are different kinds of literature in the Bible. There is history, there’s biography, there is poetry, there are songs, there are letters, there are myths of origin, there are even coded attacks against the Roman empire (like in Revelations). One of the other types of literature is Wisdom literature. It includes Job, Proverbs, Psalms, Ecclesiastes, the Song of Songs and some other books in the Apochrypha.

If Solomon is the model for Wisdom, the Proverb is the literary prototype. You all know what a proverb is. It is a short popular saying or an authoritative word. When we speak of the improving economy and say “A rising tide lifts all boats”, or when we describe a hockey team and say “ A chain is only as strong as the weakest link”, we are quoting modern proverbs. However, when we say “A good man is hard to find” we are not quoting an episode of the Bachelorette, we are quoting the prophet Micah (7:2). And when Dr. Phil says “Don’t go to bed angry” I wonder if he knows he is quoting St. Paul’s letter to the Ephesians (4:26)?

As you can see, not all Proverbs come from the Book of Proverbs. In today’s Gospel reading from Luke, when Jesus says “Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it!” he is alluding to another proverb heard earlier in the Gospel when he said “No prophet is accepted in the prophet’s hometown” (Luke 4:24).

King David is thought to have composed the Psalms. The Psalms are part of the Wisdom tradition though some are more obviously wise than others. Today’s Psalm confronts the issue of fear & responds with Wisdom. What is the wisdom on offer here?

“Be strong, and let your heart take courage; [redemption will come] wait for the LORD!”

This Sunday is the second Sunday in Lent but it is also our Vestry Sunday which means after this service we have what other organizations would call our Annual General Meeting. At this meeting we will be considering a proposed Mission Statement, some proposed Strategic Directions for the next 3 – 5 years and we will also be discussing a draft Vision statement.

The planning group working on Mission & Vision has worked hard to both represent consensus and also to challenge certain assumptions. We have struggled over what it means to be a parish in the Anglican tradition when the contradictions of the larger Anglican Communion have been laid bare for all to see.

For myself, I wonder what would it mean to claim an identity as part of the wisdom tradition? Wisdom is central to Christianity but it does not originate there. It is international but also local; it is the opposite of folly but is not the same as certainty; it requires memory, action and knowledge: remembering, doing & knowing.

What would it mean for us to identify as a community of wisdom? Diana Butler Bass, in her book Christianity for the Rest of Us, says that “Wisdom [is] not esoteric, a secret for only mature believers; rather, wisdom [is] a spiritual gift whereby thinking (the head) and knowing (the heart) joined and opened the way to God.” (p. 51) This book is a study of liberal protestant churches in the US that are growing! She describes these as the ‘new village churches’ because they have found a new way to negotiate the relationship between religious faith and a secular culture. “Although they have buildings,” Bass writes, “new village churches are primarily the communal journeys of a people finding a home in tradition, practice and wisdom.” (p. 53)

Wisdom requires doing. It requires a memory of doing the right thing in the past. It requires doing the right thing now and it requires discernment of just exactly what that right thing is: Remembering, doing & knowing.

In the very early church, followers of Jesus were known as the “people of the way” because they were people who were trying to follow the teachings of the wise Jesus as a ‘way of life’. Some people summarize the essence of that way of life as the ‘Golden Rule’: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” (Mt 7:12 & 22:39). It doesn’t say ‘do unto others as they have done to you’ but ‘do unto others as you would have them do unto you’. It is a short popular saying, an authoritative word. It is a proverb! It also exists in ancient Egyptian Wisdom, in Greek Philosophy, in Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism & Taoism. It is recognized as Wisdom in all the major religions. It is international.

Confucius said that wisdom can be learned by three methods: Reflection, imitation and experience. He said imitation was the easiest way, reflection was the noblest way and experience was the bitterest way. I recommend that when we consider our vision for the future, we consider what it would mean to claim Wisdom as our orienting image. If this seems like a scary prospect, I can only quote today’s Psalm ““Be strong, and let your heart take courage; [redemption will come] wait for the LORD!”

Christopher Lind

Psalm 27

Psalm 27 A Hymn, adapted – Ian Sowton

I AM is my light, my salvation, my life’s sanctuary,
so who can frighten me? Why should I live in fear?
2 When enemies – scoundrels all – gather to make a meal of me,
they’re going to stumble and fall flat on their faces.

3 A whole besieging army shall not cow my spirit;
even if I’m caught in a war I will stay confident.
4 One thing I asked of God, something I really long for:
to live out my life in the house of the Most High,

to fix my contemplating gaze upon God’s beauty,
to plumb my faith in the quiet of the temple.
5 When the day of trouble comes you will shelter me,
safely enfolded in the cover of your tent;

you are sure to set me in place on a high rock.
6 Now, head held high above surrounding enemies,
I will offer sacrifices in the sacred tent with shouts of joy;
I will sing and make melody to El Shaddai.

7 Hear, O God, when I call! answer in your graciousness!
8 “Come now,” says my heart, “search out Yahweh’s face!”
I truly do seek your face. 9 Do not hide it from me.
You who’ve been my help, do not turn from me in anger.

O my salvation, do not discard, do not forsake me!
10 Even if my own parents desert me, God will adopt me.
11 Instruct me in your way, O eternal Wisdom,
guide me on some level path leading past my foes.

12 Do not abandon me to the will of adversaries,
for perjurers, breathing malice, have appeared against me.
13 I believe that in my day I shall live to see God’s goodness.
14 Wait for the Most High; be strong, take courage. Wait.

Hymn: Resignation

Resignation
words: Chris Lind, tune: Resignation

1. Redemption is our call and song, our bed of straw and bone
We want to be made whole again – We want to be led home.
We’ve followed Culture’s lead to more – prosperity’s assumed;
But still we cope with hunger pangs for God won’t be consumed.

2. We thrill with peaks of ecstasy, we wallow in despair.
We yearn for easy escapades, we shun the well worn stair.
Can we not summon memory’s vane for guidance in this storm?
Yes, God has seen us here before and mercy is the norm.

3. O people gather, for our strength is stronger than alone.
Remember we are called to build the commonwealth of God.
The Market can be made to serve the common good of all,
If we but join together now, reclaiming all its power.

4. Redemption is my call and song, my bed of straw and bone
I want to be made whole again, I want to be led home.
I’ve followed Culture’s lead to more – prosperity’s assumed;
But still I cope with hunger pangs for God won’t be consumed.

Bulletin – Lent 2, Sunday, February 28

Lent 2: Feb 28, 2010

Incumbent: The Rev’d  Sherman  Hesselgrave
Music Director: Becca Whitla     Coordinator: James Harbeck
Celebrant: Sherman Hesselgrave
Homilist: Chris Lind “Building Communities of Wisdom”

Welcome to the Church of the Holy Trinity.  We are delighted to have you with us this morning. Holy Trinity is an accessible, active, vibrant, justice-seeking, queer-positive community in the heart of downtown Toronto. We try to use language in our worship which includes us all, and we encourage the extensive participation of each person in the worship and life of the Church. At the Peace we move about freely, greeting one another. During the offertory hymn we will move to create a circle around the altar for the Prayers of the People.  All are welcome to share in the Eucharist as they feel comfortable. To help you know Holy Trinity better, and to help you navigate through this service, be sure you have one of the handouts, Welcome to the Church of the Holy Trinity. A special welcome Newcomers!!!! Please fill out the Newcomers Form which will let us know how to reach you.

10 Trinity Square
Tor, Ont, M5G 1B1
Tel:(416) 598-4521
www.holytrinitytoronto.org
THE GATHERING OF THE COMMUNITY
We gather in our pews for the morning welcome
✜ Welcome
✜ Opening Meditation: To the Holy Spirit
Malcolm Dalglish – music, Wendell Berry, words
✜ Opening hymn: (All rise, in body or spirit): Be Still and Know

✜ Greeting:
All: May the grace of Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with us all.

✜ The Collect for Purity
All: All loving God to you all hearts are open, all desires known, and from you no secrets are hidden.  Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit, that we may perfectly love you, and worthily praise your holy name; through Christ our Saviour. Amen.

✜ Confession:
One:     For the absolution and remission of our sins and offenses, let us pray to God.             Silence
One:     God in your mercy:
All:     Hear our prayer.
One:     We are a forgiven people: God’s spirit is free among us.
All:     Thanks be to God.
✜ The Exchange of Peace:
It is our custom to move about to exchange the peace. Please be mindful that it is flu season. Concerns about flu mean some people are uncomfortable shaking hands and/or hugging.  A smile and nod, or the sign of peace “V” are other suggested alternatives.
One:     The Peace of Christ be always with you:
All:     And also with you.
PROCLAMATION OF THE WORD

✜ Collect for the Day: God if the covenant, you call us to be fruitful servants within creation, and to offer our lives as the foundation of your realm. We lay before you the desires of our hearts, that we may be transformed by their fulfilment. AMEN.

✜ The Hebrew Scripture: Genesis 15:1-12, 17-18
Reader: James Johnson
after the reading
Reader:     Hear what the Spirit says to God’s people
All:     Thanks be to God

✜ Psalm 27    A Hymn, adapted, Ian Sowton

IAM is my light, my salvation, my life’s sanctuary,
so who can frighten me? Why should I live in fear?
2 When enemies – scoundrels all – gather to make a meal of me,
they’re going to stumble and fall flat on their faces.

3 A whole besieging army shall not cow my spirit;
even if I’m caught in a war I will stay confident.
4 One thing I asked of God, something I really long for:
to live out my life in the house of the Most High,

to fix my contemplating gaze upon God’s beauty,
to plumb my faith in the quiet of the temple.
5 When the day of trouble comes you will shelter me,
safely enfolded in the cover of your tent;

you are sure to set me in place on a high rock.
6 Now, head held high above surrounding enemies,
I will offer sacrifices in the sacred tent with shouts of joy;
I will sing and make melody to El Shaddai.

7 Hear, O God, when I call! answer in your graciousness!
8 “Come now,” says my heart, “search out Yahweh’s face!”
I truly do seek your face. 9 Do not hide it from me.
You who’ve been my help, do not turn from me in anger.

O my salvation, do not discard, do not forsake me!
10 Even if my own parents desert me, God will adopt me.
11 Instruct me in your way, O eternal Wisdom,
guide me on some level path leading past my foes.

12 Do not abandon me to the will of adversaries,
for perjurers, breathing malice, have appeared against me.
13 I believe that in my day I shall live to see God’s goodness.
14 Wait for the Most High; be strong, take courage. Wait.

✜ Epistle: Philippians
Reader:      A Reading from . . .
Reader:      Hear what the Spirit says to the Churches
All:     Thanks be to God        Silence

✜ Hymn: Resignation    Chris Lind, tune: Resignation
All rise, in body or spirit for the hymn and Gospel.

1. Redemption is our call and song, our bed of straw and bone
We want to be made whole again – We want to be led home.
We’ve followed Culture’s lead to more – prosperity’s assumed;
But still we cope with hunger pangs for God won’t be consumed.

2. We thrill with peaks of ecstasy, we wallow in despair.
We yearn for easy escapades, we shun the well worn stair.
Can we not summon memory’s vane for guidance in this storm?
Yes, God has seen us here before and mercy is the norm.

3. O people gather, for our strength is stronger than alone.
Remember we are called to build the commonwealth of God.
The Market can be made to serve the common good of all,
If we but join together now, reclaiming all its power.

4. Redemption is my call and song, my bed of straw and bone
I want to be made whole again, I want to be led home.
I’ve followed Culture’s lead to more – prosperity’s assumed;
But still I cope with hunger pangs for God won’t be consumed.

✜ Holy Gospel: Luke 9:28-36, (37-43)            Reader: Aina Arro
Reader:     May God be with you    All: And also with you
Reader:      The Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Luke
All:    Glory to Christ our Saviour
after the reading
Reader:     The Gospel of Christ     All: Praise to Christ our Saviour

✜ Homily: “Building Communities of Wisdom” Chris Lind

LITURGY OF THE BREAD AND CUP
We gather in a circle around the altar to share the gifts of bread
and wine and other offerings, the symbols of our common life.  All
are welcome. You may also remain seated and, if you wish, communion will be brought to you. Financial offerings will also be received.  You may also join the many who give by Pre-authorized Donation; simply request a PAD form from today’s Coordinator.

✜ Offertory Hymn: “We Have This Ministry”    #510

✜Prayers of the People
In the Anglican Cycle we remember The Church of England and the Most Revd Rowan Douglas Williams Archbishop of Canterbury; in the Diocesan Cycle: Peterborough Deanery and the San Esteban congregation here at Holy Trinity. The community now offers its prayers, both spoken and unspoken. Please keep your prayers brief.

✜ The Great Thanksgiving (see orange book)
Presider: Sherman Hesselgrave
Please do not dip the bread into the wine. The bread and wine will be passed around the circle, but if you prefer you may receive at the gluten-free station at the altar.

✜The Saviour’s Prayer O God, our Mother and Father in heaven, hallowed be your name, your reign come, your will be done on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread. Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us. Save us from the time of trial and deliver us from evil.

✜ Communion Anthem:
Thuma mina, thuma mina, thuma mina, Nkosi yam
Ndi ya vuma, ndi ya vuma, ndi ya vuma, Nkosi yam
Send me Jesus, send me Jesus, send me Jesus, send me, Lord
I am willing, I am willing, I am willing, willing, Lord

✜Glory to God: Glory to God, whose power, working in us, can do infinitely more than we can ask or imagine. Glory to God, from generation to generation, in the Church and in Christ Jesus, for ever and ever. AMEN.

✜Dismissal:    p. 36 in the green booklet
Please join us after the service at the back of the church for soup.
Annual Vestry meeting will take place immediately after soup.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
February 28, 2010
WEEKLY NOTICES

Please note: On Sunday mornings, if you have any concerns related to personal safety, please speak with our Incumbent Sherman Hesselgrave, Nola Crewe, our curate or the caretaker on duty.

◆Assistive Hearing Devices are available at the rear of the church. This is an infrared system which works best if you face towards the front of the church.
◆Please help us keep tidy by picking up bulletins and hymn books after the service and returning them to the carts at the entrances of the church. Thanks
◆Prayers: Please feel free to light a candle at the chancel steps, or phone Sherman Hesselgrave with your special prayer requests.
◆Join Holy Trinity’s e-mail list! Contact Alison Kemper at:
<alisonkemper@yahoo.co.uk>
◆Scent Free Zone: Please refrain from wearing perfume, cologne, after-shave and highly scented personal hygiene products.
◆Personal Belongings should be kept with you at all times. Sadly, we cannot ensure their safety.  Members, please help newcomers and visitors keep track of their belongings.

Services Sundays
10:30 – festive contemporary Eucharist in inclusive language with music
2:00 – San Esteban misa en español – Spanish service with the community of San Esteban.
Wednesdays at 12:15pm brief spoken Eucharist with informal discussion of the day’s readings

Parish Groups and Committees
◆Worship Committee: Contact: Lee Creal: 416-466-4216
◆Refugee Committee: Contact Malcolm Savage: 416-421-7248
◆Congregational Care Committee: Contact: Sherman Hesselgrave
◆Property Committee: Contact: Jim Dolmage 416-531-26

Parish Activities and Announcements:
◆The Homeless Memorial is on the second Tuesday of every month at 12:00 outside the south doors of the church.
◆Please help keep our space looking sharp!! If your committee has a meeting or you are using the space for something else, please leave the space as it was when you started. Thank you very much.
◆Upcoming Services:
March 7 – Lent 3: Isaiah 55:1-9; Psalm 63:1-8; 1 Corinthians 10:1-13; Luke 13:1-9 Susie Henderson preaching
March 14 – Lent 4 – Sermon: “The God Who Won’t Let Go”
Sherman Hesselgrave
Readings: Joshua 5:9-12; Psalm 32; 2 Corinthians 5:16-21; Luke 15:1-3, 11b-32
March 21 – Lent 5: Isaiah 43:16-21; Psalm 126; Philippians 3:4b-14; John 12:1-8

Announcements for the Bulletin: A great way to share information with the community!! Please get your announcement for the bulletin to Becca by Monday for the following Sunday – thanks!

Parking Notice: The church itself has no parking, but parking is available, free of charge, on Sundays between 10 am and 1 pm, in the new City Hall underground parking garage. If you park at new City Hall,  please remember to bring your parking chit and have it stamped at the church. Parking is also available in the parking garage at the Bell Trinity Building for a flat rate on Sundays of $5.00.   Parking is also available at the Eaton Centre.  We are wheelchair accessible at the south entrance of the church.

Lenten Book Study: The Work of the People: What We Do in Worship and Why (Marlea Gilbert, Christopher Grundy, Eric T. Myers, and Stephanie Perdew, published by The Alban Institute). It is a quick read, about 100 pages of text divided among four chapters, with discussion questions provided. There are four groups organized across the city or feel free to create your own group. Please speak with Sherman Hesselgrave if you’d like more details. He has copies of the book available for $16.
Hearing System: We regret that our hearing assistive system is not currently available for use.   It is undergoing repairs and we expect that it will be available again within a couple of weeks. We apologize for any inconvenience.

HT CHOIR – Hymnody of Earth
The Holy Trinity choir is hosting a special choral project with three choirs this spring: We will be performing Hymnody of Earth on Sat April 17 at 8pm on the 40th anniversary of Earth Day (April 22). The composer, Malcolm Dalglish, will be here. Please mark the date in your book!!
For info, contact: bwhitla@holytrinitytoronto.org or 416-598-4521, ex 224

“WSCF at the Forefront of Student Witness”

For the Ted Scott Fund – Marie Jean de Haller Fund

Reception on Saturday, March 6    2-5 p.m.
Toronto School of Theology
47 Queen’s Park Crescent East, Toronto, ON
Enter Side Entrance St. Joseph St.             Bring a friend.

Address at 3:15 pm
Featuring: Michael Wallace, General Secretary
World Student Christian Federation
Geneva, Switzerland

Visitors are warmly welcome at Holy Trinity.

If you would like to leave a record of your visit or make a request, please complete this form and place it in the collection plate.

Name:
Telephone:
Email:
Request/Comment:

loving justice in the heart of our city