Tag Archives: justice

King Lear at The Toronto Homeless Memorial

On Tuesday, February 13th at the  Toronto Homeless Memorial a small excerpt of King Lear, called Too Little Care will be performed. Walter Borden, actor, playwright, activist and member of the Order of Canada, will take the title role. Peyton LeBarr and Michael Bennet Leroux round out the cast as Kent and the Fool, respectively.
Lear is a King who finds himself homeless and dispossessed in the middle of a terrible storm. He comes to the realization that people in his kingdom live like this all the time, and that he, as ruler, has “(taken) too little care of this”.

Continue reading King Lear at The Toronto Homeless Memorial

“echoes of cosmic events”

Epiphany Sermon 2018

by Joanna Manning

Today’s celebration of the Epiphany has always been one of my
favourites. I find it’s full of mystery, and it speaks to the
imagination and the poetic.

The word ‘Epiphany’ means ‘manifestation’ or ‘revelation.’ In
today’s feast there are traditionally have been three levels of
revelation that have been celebrated. First, the Magi are led to
the manger and the light of Christ is manifested to the gentiles.
Then Epiphany is often linked with the Baptism of Christ by
John, and the launch of Jesus’ public ministry, with the
testimony of the voice from heaven confirming that ‘This is my
Beloved Son’ followed by the manifestation of the Holy Spirit in
the form of a dove. Epiphany is also linked with John’s account
of the Marriage Feast of Cana, where Jesus first manifests his
power to the disciples by turning water into wine, a symbol of
the wedding feast that joins heaven and earth, God and
humankind, into a new and joyous union. Continue reading “echoes of cosmic events”

National Housing Strategy Update

by Michael Shapcott
On the second Tuesday of every month, two dozen or more people gather at the south doors of Holy Trinity for a memorial to remember, by name, those who have died on Toronto’s streets. The homeless memorial, which has close to 1,000 names, offers a small measure of dignity to people who have died without housing. Each month, the small gathering renews its call for a National Housing Strategy to end homelessness in Toronto and across Canada. Over the years, our quiet remembrance has reverberated in Parliament and in other halls of power.

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Homily: November 18 2017

Isaiah 58: 1 to 12
Psalm: 72: 1 to 15a
Revelation 21: 1 to 4
Luke 10: 25-37

Good morning.

None of our lessons, not even the Psalm, were appointed for reading today. So, I’ll start by revealing the hidden agenda behind today’s worship: Driving our hearts and minds towards the third of our strategic planning sessions for Holy Trinity. That session begins just after today’s worship service ends. Continue reading Homily: November 18 2017

Sour Grapes

By James Harbeck

Sermon, Holy Trinity, October 1, 2017

Readings: Ezekiel 18:1–4, 25–32; Psalm 25:1–10; Philippians 2:1–13; Matthew 21: 23–32

I’m going to tell a little story today. I don’t know whether I’d call it a parable. It’s not quite a literal history. But it’s close enough.

There was, once, a place that was very nice. Lush. Great for growing grapes and things like that. There was a family living there, and they were pretty happy with it. We’ll call them the Ones. Nothing’s perfect, but, you know, the Ones had food, family, all the things that people do with their time when nothing and no one is forcing them to do something else. Life was good enough.

And then another family showed up from another place. We’ll call them the Twos. They liked where the Ones were living. They wanted to live there. They didn’t say, “Hey, do you mind if we fit in here somehow?” or “What can we give you in exchange for some of what you have so we can live here?” They said, “Hi. We’re the Twos. These are guns. Look what they can do: [BANG BANG BANG]. Get the idea? We want this land. Oh, you? You can get out and live somewhere else, or you can stay and work for us.” Some of the Ones left. Some were killed. Some decided to stay and work for the Twos, because at least they’d still be in this nice place getting the benefit of the land. Continue reading Sour Grapes