Tag Archives: shapcott

“We have met the enemy, and he is us”

July 8, 2018

The Jesuit priest James Martin tells of his drive near the Rift Valley in Kenya two decades ago:

“I was transfixed by the verdant green grass that carpeted the hillside”, he writes. “Suddenly, seemingly from nowhere, a lone white sheep clambered down the hillside and darted in front of my car. I swerved to avoid hitting it… Then I watched the sheep gingerly climb down into the valley on the right side of the road. Just then, from my left, a figure darted across the road. It was a young Maasai shepherd… The shepherd dashed in front of my idling car. Barefoot, he smiled and waved to me as he passed. He scrambled down the side of the hill in pursuit of the sheep, raising clouds of dust, calling loudly all the time… Then I looked up and saw the rest of the flock, about twenty or thirty sheep, up the hill on my left. How stupid! I thought. He’s leaving behind the whole flock for that one sheep. Then something dawned on me, and I laughed out loud. It was the Parable of the Lost Sheep in action!”

Continue reading “We have met the enemy, and he is us”

“May we be courageous today. May we learn today. May we love today.”

 June 10, 2018 – Church of Holy Trinity, Trinity Square

Our sisters and brothers at the Corrymeela Community, Northern Ireland’s longest-serving centre for peace and reconciliation, begin their day with these words:

“We resolve to live life in its fullness:

We will welcome the people who’ll be part of this day.

We will greet God in ordinary and hidden moments.”

What a remarkable story from the Book of Samuel. The elders of Israel complain to Samuel about the judges who were the government of the day. Israel was a group of scattered tribes under attack by the Philistines. The elders wanted a strong man for protection.

Continue reading “May we be courageous today. May we learn today. May we love today.”

A Christian response to climate crisis

Everyone is welcome to join in week three of our exploration of former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams’s book Faith in the Public Square. He begins his chapter on a Christian response to the climate crisis with these words:

“The nature of [the climate] crisis could be summed up rather dramatically by saying that it’s a loss of a sense for what life is. I don’t mean the ‘meaning of life’ in the normal way we use that phrase. I mean a sense of life as the web of interactions, mutual givings and receiving, that makes up the world we inhabit. Seeing this more clearly helps us dismantle the strange fictions we create about ourselves as human beings. We are disconnected and we need to be reintroduced to life.”
We’ll read selected excerpts from the former ABC’s book, view a short video or two, look at some Biblical and other wisdom, and share our ideas with each other.
No preparation is required, and you don’t need to have attended previous Sunday morning forums to be a most welcome addition to this Sunday.