Photos: Good Friday Walk for Justice

This past Good Friday, March 30, 2018, Holy Trinity hosted parts of the Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice.

About the walk: “The Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice began 35 years ago.  Each year, the ecumenical planning team creates a map of stations to lift up current struggles. Over the years, we have stopped at the courthouse steps to protest racial profiling, at bank towers to repent valuing profits over people, and in back alleys to hear the stories of the poor. We have stood with refugees, advocated for missing and murdered Aboriginal women, and worshiped with the Occupy movement.

See photos from this year’s walk below:

2018 Photos from the Walk

A Grain of Wheat (Homily for Lent 5)

Homily March 18, 2018

by Jo Connelly

Fifth Sunday in Lent

“The days are surely coming, says the Holy One, when I will make a new covenant” says Jeremiah.

As Ian Sowton wrote:

“We wait on you.  Do not press REWIND,
returning things to the good old days
that never were.  Plant something new
in us,”

And Jesus proclaimed in John’s gospel:

“The truth of the matter is unless a grain of wheat falls on the ground and dies, it remains only a single grain; but if it dies, it yields a rich harvest.”

I am here before you to declare that we, the Holy Trinity community are embarking on a new covenant.  Together we are going to forge a new way forward using our Strategic Planning consultations as a guide.  This won’t be easy. For each of us it will entail parts of what we dreamed about as the “ideal community” coming to light but other parts we hoped for will need to die as a grain of wheat falling on the ground.  For some, there will be excitement as parts we hoped for will be reflected in what we see, for others we won’t see enough of what we hoped for. We are on a journey, and none of us will see everything we wanted. Continue reading A Grain of Wheat (Homily for Lent 5)

Dry-Bone Valley

It’s like trying to stay upright,
scorched and breathless, in the blast
of some sneezing rot-toothed dragon.

This guided tour, God, is tough going.
As vistas go, it’s in questionable taste–hills
bare-ribbed and drought-dried to the bone;

Satan plays Lego with Rwandan skeletons,
chews over the remains of hope in Darfur
and a thousand other slums:

such pornography of desolation–
O God, can these bones live?
how have we been brought to this?

We wait on you.  Do not press REWIND,
returning things to the good old days
that never were.  Plant something new

in us, reassemble the strewn backbones
of our resolve, breathe prophecy into us
so that blade by blade, tuft by tuft

we may animate these Lenten slopes
with living green of Easter hopes.

Dry-Bone Valley (Ezekiel 37:1-14) by Ian Sowton from The Stink of Experience

A Christian response to climate crisis

Everyone is welcome to join in week three of our exploration of former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams’s book Faith in the Public Square. He begins his chapter on a Christian response to the climate crisis with these words:

“The nature of [the climate] crisis could be summed up rather dramatically by saying that it’s a loss of a sense for what life is. I don’t mean the ‘meaning of life’ in the normal way we use that phrase. I mean a sense of life as the web of interactions, mutual givings and receiving, that makes up the world we inhabit. Seeing this more clearly helps us dismantle the strange fictions we create about ourselves as human beings. We are disconnected and we need to be reintroduced to life.”
We’ll read selected excerpts from the former ABC’s book, view a short video or two, look at some Biblical and other wisdom, and share our ideas with each other.
No preparation is required, and you don’t need to have attended previous Sunday morning forums to be a most welcome addition to this Sunday.

loving justice in the heart of our city