Tag Archives: Palm Sunday

Holy Week at Holy Trinity

You are invited to join us for the whole Easter Story or just what speaks to your soul.

Services:

  • Sunday, March 20 10:30 AM Palm Sunday Service with the procession of Palms – separate program for youth and children
  • Thursday,  March 24 6:00 PM Maundy Thursday with service, supper that involves youth, children, and the San Esteban (Spanish speaking) community. A family sleepover follows
  • Friday, March 25 10:30 AM Solemn Good Friday Liturgy with Choral Music.  Program provided for young people.
  • Friday, March 25 2:00 PM Ecumenical Good Friday Walk for Justice theme this year is “I thirst…” This year the walk will begin at Lake Ontario and proceed up Bay Street to Holy Trinity.  Details on the EGFW  website
  • Saturday, March 26 8:00 PM The Great Vigil of Easter This service includes Biblical readings, the lighting of the Paschal Fire and a service of light, remembering our baptismal vows, and the First Eucharist of Easter. Young people and families are active in the leadership of the service.
  • Sunday, March 27 10:30 AM Easter Eucharist with an all ages present. We will flower the cross and share the Eucharist followed by a celebratory lunch and Easter Egg Hunt. We will use both English and Spanish in this service.

Disrupting Empire – service text

PDF: HT bulletin Mar 29 Palm Sunday 4

While empire in Jesus’ time consisted of distinct forms of oppression including military occupation, violence, unjust taxation, and slavery, … we have to look deeper and wider to put a recognizable face on empire. … As stated in To Seek Justice and Resist Evil, contemporary “empire is not dominated by any single state but by a network of powerful economic interests held together by the ideology of neoliberalism,” and furthermore, is a system in which most of us play some role, wittingly or unwittingly.
Living Faithfully in the Midst of Empire, United Church of Canada, 2006

Territorial Acknowledgement

We acknowledge that we gather upon the traditional territories of the Mississauga Anishaabeg, Haudenosaunee and Wendat Indigenous Peoples, the original nations of this land, who continue to cry out for justice.

prelude – Entry of the Kings

Opening – Prepare ye the way of the lord

Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem was not a simple act of obedience to God, following some preordained path to destruction and ancient prophesy. It was a radical challenge to an Empire that could not be physically resisted. It was a powerful act of political theatre and call to revolutionary change that still reverberates today. Unfortunately, empire continues to dominate our lives.
Let us prepare ourselves to join Christ’s parade into Jerusalem by first asking each other for forgiveness. Continue reading Disrupting Empire – service text

Disrupting Empire – Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as political theatre

As Canadians and Christians we feel a lot of social pressure to be nice. To not cause trouble. Especially for folks who seem nice. Nobody should be distressed. Let’s keep everything, on the surface anyway, agreeable and pleasant. Well that’s nice isn’t it? Sometimes it’s even a good thing. But sometimes what is required is real honesty. Whether that’s telling our true feelings to a friend who needs to know, or speaking a difficult truth to those in power. Or even challenging our own assumptions.

However, that desire to smooth things over can be overwhelming at times. We may choose silence or couched words over challenging conversation. Or we may avoid someone or something altogether rather than offering a challenge and engagement that might spark personal growth or a healed relationship. Continue reading Disrupting Empire – Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem as political theatre

Palm Sunday – Disrupting Empire

fist-palm3The story of Palm Sunday is a story of theatrical resistance: a usurping of entrenched authority. The procession into Jerusalem parodied the imperial triumphus of the roman occupiers and even that of earlier Jewish kings. Christ’s entry into Jerusalem claimed the imagery of power and turned it on its head–a donkey, not a war horse; children, beggars, parents and labourers, not an army and priests.  His entry proclaimed not imperial power, but a new realm of peace: a place where what matters are not the powers, but the people and the land itself.

Join Fallen Angles and the whole community of Holy Trinity as we consider Christ’s disruptive power in the face of empire, both then and now, in story, movement and song.

March 29 at 10:30am